‘Little Spain’ in Berlin

‘Little Spain’ in Berlin
Germany has just received the biggest wave of Spanish immigrants since the 60’. You can see this not only in the statistics but you can feel it in the street of the so-called new Spanish town (districts of Kreuzberg and Neukölln). Tapas bars, shops where you can buy ‘jamón serrano’ and lentils, places to hear Spanish music and even ‘churrerías’ have invaded the districts of Kreuzberg and Neukölln, which is now known as Kreuzköll, the result of mixing both names.

OECD (The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) says in a report that during the first six months of 2012 the number of Spanish immigrants arriving increased by 53% related to the same period of the previous year. The number of Spanish people getting social security benefit has risen from 14.527 in 2011 to 37.821 in 2012. However the number of immigrants in total could be three times more than this. Due to the fact that most of them are not registered because the have minijobs (they don’t need to be registered if they are working less that 40 hours a month or receiving less that 450 euros) or they are self-employed or they are unemployed.
Spain has 25,1% total unemployment (54% of which is made up by people under 25) in contrast only 5.1% total unemployment in Germany. This is the principal reason for this movement to Germany.
43% of the immigrants who arrive in Germany have high qualifications. Many even having two careers, plus masters and some are multilingual.